Categories
Environment Featured Health

A day to safely dispose of old medications, vaping devices

Expired, unused and unwanted prescription drugs and vaping devices can be safely disposed 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at six Delaware State Police offices. Take Back Day is free and anonymous.

The Drug Enforcement Administration, which is partnering with the police, says the event keeps languishing medicine from being diverted, misused or abused. It also keeps unwanted pills from damaging the environment when they’re put in the trash or flushed down the toilet.

Vaping devices and cartridges are accepted, but not devices containing lithium ion batteries. If batteries cannot be removed, the federal agency encourages consumers to consult with stores that recycle lithium ion batteries.

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The drop-offs

New Castle County: Delaware State Police Troop 2, 100 Corporal Stephen J. Ballard Way, Newark; and Delaware State Police Troop 9, 414 Main St., Odessa.

Kent County: Delaware State Police Troop 3, 3759 S. State Street, Camden.

Sussex County: Delaware State Police Troop 4, 23652 Shortly Road, Georgetown; Delaware State Police Troop 5, 9265 Public Safety Way, Bridgeville; and Delaware State Police Troop 7, 18006 Coastal Highway, Lewes.

In 2019, 445 tons of medications was dropped off nationwide at Take Back Day.

Categories
Featured Government Health

Delaware’s COVID-19 cases continue to increase but not as rapidly

While the number of Delaware’s COVID-19 cases are continue to rise, they did not rise as sharply in the past week as they had in previous ones.

The state also said Friday that about 30 percent of long-term care facility residents who are diagnosed with COVID-19 die from it. That’s 388 residents out of 1,387 cases.

The Delaware Division of Public Health weekly report said that the seven-day average for the percentage of persons who tested positive for COVID-19 decreased from 6.6% as of Oct. 8, to 5.5% as of Thursday, Oct. 15. The state would like that to be under 3 percent.

It said the number of hospitalizations remains at 104, with 26 people critically ill, up five from last week.

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The state reported 11 additional deaths since last week’s update. Of those who have died, 347 were female and 315 were male; 330 people were from New Castle County, 119 from Kent County, and 213 from Sussex County.

The Division of Public Health also said that 22 students and 19 staff members in child care facilities have tested positive between Sept. 1 and Oct. 15. In the same time period, 43 students and 17 staff members in private K-12 schools and 17 students and 62 staff members in public schools also did.  The state reports the total number in aggregate and does not break the stats down into weekly slices.

Additional information on COVID-19 cases and deaths can be found on the state’s My Healthy Community data portal at de.gov/healthycommunity.

 

Categories
Entertainment Featured Health

Aunt Mary Pat brings the humor to help raise money to fight breast cancer

Aunt Mary Pat will use laughter to help raise money for the Delaware Breast Cancer Coalition.

The popular character created by Wilmington’s Troy Hendrickson will appear on an indoor stage on Oct 29, the first time she has since the COVID-19 pandemic began. 

The 90-minute show at Catherine Rooney’s in Trolley Square will only be opened to 40 ticket holders to ensure social distancing. Tickets are $100  and can be found here. The show will be livestreamed at 7 p.m. Nov 5 for $25. 

“My grandmother was a breast cancer survivor,” said Hendrickson. “It means a lot to me to be able to give back to the community.” 

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The live event includes a silent auction, food and drinks (two drink tickets are included in the purchase of a ticket) and a DBCC swag bag. 

Hendrickson said Aunt Mary Pat’s 90-minute live comedy show will include music performances, crowd work and all things Philadelphia. 

“I describe it as a variety show,” said Hendrickson. “Some of the stories come directly from my mom and others are just things that pop into my head.” 

The character Aunt Mary Pat came to life after she was created by Hendrickson for a video making fun of his mom after the Philadelphia Eagles won the Super Bowl in 2018. 

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He sees Aunt Mary Pat as an archetype of the average South Philly mom who works in the area — in her case, a grocery store — and gossips about area wives. 

Hendrickson grew up in Wilmington and went to Columbia College in Chicago for film and TV, but he has been performing in some way since he was in middle school. During the last decade, he’s focused on drag shows.

He set Aunt Mary Pat’s character as Philadelphian because there’s such strong personality types associated with that city.

“Wilmington doesn’t really have its own identity, so we all really cling to the Philadelphian area,” Hendrickson said. “I’ve also been working in the Philly area. You just pick up how people talk, and it becomes a part of your vernacular.” 

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Hendrickson partnered with Delaware Breast Cancer Coalition through a former coworker, Sue Murray, now operations Director of the DBCC. Murray has  been supportive of Hendrickson’s career since the beginning. 

He has been performing fulltime as Aunt Mary Pat since 2018 when the character became popular online. That’s meant producing 300 events per year between Aunt Mary Pat and drag shows, he said.

Stand-up comedy was a first for him when Aunt Mary Pat became a hit. 

“We were doing our first national tour this year. The last show I was able to do was in New York before COVID put everything on hold,” Hendrickson said. “It was the trickiest thing for the entertainment industry because everything happened so quickly, and we all had to cancel events.”

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Hendrickson has been able to do online shows as well as a number of in-person outdoor shows during the summer. The breast cancer event will be the first indoor event he has been a part of since coronavirus shutdowns were put in place. 

“We’re well under the room’s capacity,” Hendrickson said. “I feel pretty safe about it.” 

Patrons will be required to wear masks, but he doesn’t expect that to stop the laughter.

“There’s a great need for live entertainment right now, I think,” Hendrickson said, “especially where people get to be around other people.”

Categories
Art Featured Health Music Scene About Town

What’s a choir to do? Sing in a Delaware parking garage

garage sing
The choir members were spread out over 40 feet and wore masks while performing, sometimes to piana music powered by a (really) long extension cords.

Accustomed to gathering regularly to make music, those of us who are choral singers have had six months without this (often weekly) source of comfort and joy.

You can sing along with recordings, embark on some sporadic ventures on YouTube, or even warble in the shower. But it’s not the same as joining with others to craft something that’s greater than yourself. 

Ensembles everywhere are looking for ways to stay connected, and throughout the pandemic, conductor David Schelat has been Zooming with members of his three ensembles – Mastersingers of Wilmington, Center City Chorale and the Chancel Choir of First & Central Presbyterian Church – to keep their collegial spirit alive.

But recently, he decided it was appropriate and timely to sing again. 

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In mid-September, David invited members of these groups to meet downtown. Strictly adhering to gathering requirements, he required masks and RSVPs and limited us to 30 of a potential 70 singers.

The response was – not surprisingly – enthusiastic.

And so, on an early October Saturday morning, with the generous assent of facilitys owner Buccini/Pollin Group, we trudged up steps to the top level of a downtown Orange Street parking garage. There we picked up prepared packets of music, arranged ourselves in four voice sections on our blue tape marks, pulled out the five chosen choral works, and began to sing. 

Choral singing is universally loved by its worldwide participants, who cite the sense of community it creates as they breathe together, listen to one another and seek a unified sound.  It embraces singers of all types – from enthusiastic volunteers to professionals – and our group was no exception.

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Several were highly trained, sought-after paid singers; others were (as one singer self-described) “a church choir soprano.” But we were all there for the same reason, and it was heartening and moving to gather once again.

David chose a variety of music, and we began with a work many of us knew – the motet “Rejoice in the Lord Always,” written by that famous composer Anonymous sometime in the 16th century.

Each singer was at least 6 feet from the next person (sometimes more), with the entire group spreading about 40 feet from side to side.

Garage sing
Members of three choirs arrive to spread out and try to blend their voices in a concrete parking garage.

Choir members normally like to be in proximity, so at first our attempt to achieve a blended sound across those distances was challenging – even humorous. But oddly, the garage’s vaulting open spaces and its drab concrete surfaces were surprisingly cathedral-like – one singer called it “the Garage Majal” – and slowly, we got a group sound going.

After we acquired some choral equilibrium, we sang David’s own 2006 composition “If Ye Love Me,” a touching anthem, especially in these times, and a favorite of his singers. Then we launched into the lively “Soon-Ah Will Be Done” in an arrangement by William Dawson, a Black composer who was one of the first to bring spirituals into the concert halls. 

Next, David led us in Louis Vierne’s powerful “Kyrie” from his “Solemn Mass.”. Vierne was the organist at Notre Dame from 1900 t0 1937, and the work was written to be sung in the vast spaces of that Parisian cathedral (alas, no music there now after the great fire). It sounded surprisingly resonant in our “garage acoustic.” 

And we finished with a rousing Zulu song, most probably murdering that liquid language but reveling in its triumphant music. 

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Some of these works were sung a cappella (without any accompaniment), while for others David played on an electronic keyboard powered by a really, really long extension cord. The hour-long gathering felt safe and welcoming.

Above all, even though we couldn’t greet one another with the usual hugs or handshakes, it was powerful to be once again in a musical embrace.

“People who love singing together have missed it a lot,” said David, “and I felt that this was a way to pull these singers together in a way what would be both safe and meaningful.” 

Our enterprising conductor is planning another garage gathering Saturday, and he’s expecting another enthusiastic response.

Gail Obenreder is a member of Mastersingers of Wilmington and writes about the arts for various publications.

 

Categories
Business Featured Food & Dining Health Scene About Town

Eat up: Brandywine Valley Restaurant Week returns

 

When Brandywine Valley Restaurant Week debuted in 2014, it gave independent restaurants a chance to showcase their cuisine.

With only a few exceptions, most of the eateries have been locally owned and managed. 

Today, that mission has an increased emphasis. The pandemic has had a devastating impact on most restaurants, said Dan Butler, owner of Piccolina Toscana in Trolley Square, who helped start the first restaurant week.

Running from Oct. 12 to Oct. 22 this year, the promotion is a way to increase business during this challenging time. 

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Eighteen restaurants are offering fixed-price (prix-fixe) meals. Lunch, if available, is $15; dinner is $35.

At Piccolina Toscana, for instance, you can have an appetizer, entrée and dessert. Selections include tuna tartare, all-day braised short rib over hand-rolled gnocchi in a gorgonzola cream sauce and tiramisu. 

Although restaurant week just started, Andrea Sikora has seen a boost in sales at the restaurants she owns with her husband, Bryan. 

The couple’s participating restaurants include Crow Bar in Trolley Square, La Fia in downtown Wilmington and Hearth Kitchen in Kennett Square.

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“So far, we’ve been busier this week than we have been normally at this time,” said Sikora. “It’s absolutely bringing people out.”

Some people don’t know about the promotion when they make reservations, but they decide to order the special when they see the menu, Butler said.

 It works both ways, however.

“From my experience doing restaurant week, most diners come for the prix-fixe menu but order off our regular menu,” said Dan Tagle, executive chef of Krazy Kat’s in Montchanin. “It opens new doors to customers that we haven’t had before.”

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The catch is that Delaware has limited restaurants to 60% capacity to curb the coronavirus’s spread. 

“We can’t accommodate as many people as we normally would during restaurant week,” Sikora noted.

This year, guests can also order the special meals to go. Sikora’s restaurants, for instance, have added them to their online ordering platform. 

The promotion is presented by the Greater Wilmington & Convention Visitors Bureau, the Delaware Tourism Office, the Wilmington mayor’s office, Mispillion River Brewing and Standard Distributing.

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“Connecting with friends and family over a meal remains a top activity for visitors and residents alike,” said Sarah Willoughby, executive director of the Greater Wilmington & Convention Visitors Bureau, in a press release. 

Butler, for one, is thrilled that the organizers brought the Brandywine Valley Restaurant Week back despite the pandemic. 

“You can still dine out safely. My goal with the promotion is to, in some way, call people back. ‘We get it. You need to feel safe.’ If you put your toe in and the water is fine, maybe you will go out to dinner again — safely.”

Paul Bouchard, managing partner of Tonic Seafood & Steak, didn’t hesitate to sign up for the promotion. “We felt it was important to join with the other restaurants and create some feeling of normalcy,” he said.

This year, the featured restaurants include Agave Mexican Cuisine, Bardea Food & Drink, BBC Tavern & Grill, Café Mezzanotte, Chelsea Tavern, Columbus Inn, Crow Bar. Cromwell’s American Tavern & Taqueria, Eclipse Bistro, Harry’s Savoy Grill, Hearth Kitchen, Krazy Kat’s, La Fia, Mikimitos, Piccolina Toscana, The Back Burner, Tonic Seafood and Steak, and Walter’s Steakhouse.

For more information, go to brandywinetaste.com.

Categories
Featured Government Health

Public Health: No more virus hotspots, but state is watching several places

 

Gov. John Carney talks during Tuesday COVID-19 press conference.

COVID-19 hot spot areas have  cooled off around the state, including in Newark, but public health officials are watching several locations up and down Delaware where positive cases are higher than expected.

Dr. Karyl Rattay, director of the Division of Public Health, said Tuesday during Gov. John Carney’s weekly coronavirus press briefing that the rise in of positive cases of the coronavirus in Newark had slowed, partly because of a sharp decrease in cases related to the University of Delaware.

In the last week, the university has seen less than eight 8 additional cases of COVID-19 on its campus. 

The number of coronavirus cases were one of many issues discussed during the press conference, which touched on rising hospitalizations, an increase in testing in the last two weeks and the state’s plan to distribute a vaccine when it is available.

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Carney thanked the UD President Dennis Assanis, Newark Mayor Jerry Clifton and the Newark police department for their work in helping to limit the spread of coronavirus in Newark.

Rattay characterized locations the state is monitoring as “warm spots,” including zip code 19801 in Wilmington, Brandywine Hundred, Laurel, Bridgeville, Ellendale, Lewis, Georgetown and Camden-Wyoming.

Among other things that came up:

  • Social and family activities are risks for positive cases. Rattay talked about a house party in which 50% of susceptible people tested positive afterwards. She detailed another case in which 14 relatives were in the same house with a teenager who had become positive, and nobody wore masks or social distanced. Ultimately, 11 of the others in the house tested positive.

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  • A.J. Schall Jr., director of the Delaware Emergency Management Agency, said the state tested  34,287 people during the last two weeks, a high number achieved partly because there are many groups being tested, including school workers and students. Carney said the state may reach its “stretch goal” of testing 80,000 people per month.
  • Carney offered a few more details about the Monday settlement of a lawsuit that means the state will more that double its spending on low income children, children with disabilities and English learning children.
  • Carney said a rise in hospitalizations is partially attributable to a rise in cases in four Delaware nursing homes, but state contact tracers are investigating why those cases reached the hospital.
  • The state announced citizens can now see data about hospitalization in each Delaware county on its COVID-19 dashboard.

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  • Carney urged workers to seek out retraining being paid for by federal CARES dollars in high-demand areas such as healthcare, construction, hospitality, transportation, and information technology. 
  • Rattay repeated that the state will now publicize two difference kinds of testing data. One will be the total number of tests and one will be people tested. That will allow two different views of the data and will mesh with frequently reported number from Johns Hopkins University and the CDC. For example: there have been 315,752 Delawareans tested. But those Delawareans have had 486,262 tests because some people have been tested more than once.
  • Rattay said that the state must send a vaccine plan to the CDC on Friday, that the state will get more definitive strategies from the federal government and that others including hospitals, private doctors and pharmacies will participate in the program. She will continue to release updates about it, she said. The state, she emphasized, will not distribute a vaccine that is not safe and has not gone through the Food and Drug Adminstration approval or received Emergency Use Authorization
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Categories
Headlines Health

10 million pounds of food for the needy in Delaware

Food Bank of Delaware mobile pantry
The Food Bank of Delaware this month is on schedule to have given out 10 million pounds of food since the pandemic began.

The Food Bank of Delaware this month is notching a disturbing number: 10 million pounds of food distributed to families struggling to afford food since COVID-19 restrictions began.

The food bank is scheduling drive-thru mobile pantries in all three counties, Oct. 19-22, to make its critical support more accessible.

“We saw a dip in number of visits to our on-site food pantries and our drive-thru distributions over the summer, but we are seeing those numbers increase,” said Kim Turner, communications director for the food bank.

Since March 16, the food bank has served 23,218 households at drive-thrus and 20,803 households at its Healthy Pantry Centers in Newark and Milford.

Year to year, the numbers look bleak. For Jan. 1 through Oct. 2 of 2019, the food bank distributed 7.8 million pounds of food. For the same dates this year, it distributed 13.2 million pounds.

“Prior to COVID-19 there were 121,850 food-insecure Delawareans,” she said. “We now estimate that due to the pandemic there will be 171,930 food-insecure Delawareans this year.”

Gov. John Carney declared a state of emergency on March 16, and the pantry gave out more than 950,000 pounds of food that week – by far the highest so far this year.

The numbers don’t trend neatly. Distribution the first four weeks of the pandemic was the highest, at 1.9 million pounds, followed by 1.3 million pounds the next four weeks (roughly mid-April to mid-May), then 1.6 million pounds, 1.3 million pounds, 970,000 pounds, 1.2 million pounds and 1.2 millions in successive four-week periods.

Households helped at its Healthy Pantry Centers in Newark and Milford don’t trend neatly, either, from a low of 353 a week to a high of 1,055.

A Food Bank of Delaware drive-thru mobile pantry in August.

The plans for the drive-thrus

Each mobile pantry can handle 1,000 households. Advance registration is available, and so is on-site registration. Service will be first-come, first-served. Assistance is limited to one per household, and recipients must bring proof of ID and Delaware residency.

New Castle County, Thursday, Oct. 22 starting at 11 a.m. at Glasgow High School, 1901 S. College Ave, advance registration and a request for volunteers.

Kent County, Wednesday, Oct. 21 starting at 11 a.m. at Dover International Speedway, 1131 N. du Pont Highway, with advance registration and a request for volunteers

Sussex County, Monday, Oct. 19 starting at 11 a.m. at Crossroad Community Church, 20684 State Forest Road, Georgetown, with advance registration and a request for volunteers.

 

Categories
Economy Featured Health Scene About Town

10 million pounds of food for the needy in Delaware

A Food Bank of Delaware drive-thru mobile pantry
The Food Bank of Delaware this month is on schedule to have given out 10 million pounds of food since the pandemic began.

The Food Bank of Delaware this month is notching a disturbing number: 10 million pounds of food distributed to families struggling to afford food since COVID-19 restrictions began.

The food bank is scheduling drive-thru mobile pantries in all three counties, Oct. 19-22, to make its critical support more accessible.

“We saw a dip in number of visits to our on-site food pantries and our drive-thru distributions over the summer, but we are seeing those numbers increase,” said Kim Turner, communications director for the food bank.

Since March 16, the food bank has served 23,218 households at drive-thrus and 20,803 households at its Healthy Pantry Centers in Newark and Milford.

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Year to year, the numbers look bleak. For Jan. 1 through Oct. 2 of 2019, the food bank distributed 7.8 million pounds of food. For the same dates this year, it distributed 13.2 million pounds.

“Prior to COVID-19 there were 121,850 food-insecure Delawareans,” she said. “We now estimate that due to the pandemic there will be 171,930 food-insecure Delawareans this year.”

Gov. John Carney declared a state of emergency on March 16, and the pantry gave out more than 950,000 pounds of food that week – by far the highest so far this year.

The numbers don’t trend neatly. Distribution the first four weeks of the pandemic was the highest, at 1.9 million pounds, followed by 1.3 million pounds the next four weeks (roughly mid-April to mid-May), then 1.6 million pounds, 1.3 million pounds, 970,000 pounds, 1.2 million pounds and 1.2 millions in successive four-week periods.

Households helped at its Healthy Pantry Centers in Newark and Milford don’t trend neatly, either, from a low of 353 a week to a high of 1,055.

A Food Bank of Delaware drive-thru mobile pantry
A Food Bank of Delaware drive-thru mobile pantry in August.

The plans for the drive-thrus

Each mobile pantry can handle 1,000 households. Advance registration is available, and so is on-site registration. Service will be first-come, first-served. Assistance is limited to one per household, and recipients must bring proof of ID and Delaware residency.

New Castle County, Thursday, Oct. 22 starting at 11 a.m. at Glasgow High School, 1901 S. College Ave, advance registration and a request for volunteers.

Kent County, Wednesday, Oct. 21 starting at 11 a.m. at Dover International Speedway, 1131 N. du Pont Highway, with advance registration and a request for volunteers

Sussex County, Monday, Oct. 19 starting at 11 a.m. at Crossroad Community Church, 20684 State Forest Road, Georgetown, with advance registration and a request for volunteers.

Categories
Health

New facility brings expanded services to Sussex County


Bayhealth is pleased to announce plans for the construction of a new outpatient center offering a range of care services located at the intersection of Lewes-Georgetown Highway and Hudson Road near Milton. The new facility will bring more primary care physicians, specialists, walk-in and emergency care and diagnostic services to our southern Delaware region. The Delaware Health Resources Board recently granted Bayhealth preliminary approval to move forward with plans for a combination emergency department and walk-in care center on the 18-acre site.

“We are thrilled to bring life-saving emergency services and walk-in care to this fast growing community. We believe emergency care will be a great complement to our new outpatient center which will provide a comprehensive array of healthcare services and bring more convenient access to care for residents of Sussex County,” said Bayhealth President and CEO Terry Murphy, FACHE.

All patients arriving for walk-in or emergency services at Bayhealth’s new location will receive a medical screening exam to determine their necessary level of care. Only patients who medically qualify as emergency patients will be charged an emergency department rate. Non-emergency cases will be charged as a walk-in clinic visit.

“Our center near Milton will provide additional options for a growing community to access several important types of care. Primary care, which is in great demand in Delaware, will be available, as well as specialists, extensive testing, and a spectrum of immediate and emergency care. Our focus is on providing cost effective services that address the community’s needs,” said Bayhealth Senior Vice President and Chief Medical Officer Gary Siegelman, MD, MSc. “This model ensures patients have access to the various levels of care they may need in one location.”

Categories
Headlines Health

Milford Lifestyles & Fitness Center offers post-rehab membership

by Terry Rogers 

Milford Lifestyles and Fitness Center recently opened in the Milford Wellness Village offering medically-based fitness programs. Although its location is the same as the former Milford Memorial Hospital gym, the space has been upgraded with new machinery as well as a room dedicated to those who need specialized equipment due to injury or illness. In addition to programs focused on weight loss and physical fitness, the facility offers a Post-Rehab Membership that is designed to bridge the gap between healthcare and fitness.

“It is a unique program designed to develop and implement exercise programming for clients with disease and disability as well as those coping with multiple conditions,” Cara Konlian, CEO, said. “We offer typical gym equipment such as treadmills, elliptical trainers and weights, but we also have one entire room dedicated to those who need physical therapy equipment, such as parallel bars, t-bands, therapy balls, trampolines, or other equipment designed for advanced therapy.”

Advanced therapy at Milford Lifestyles and Fitness Center

Client are evaluated by a licensed physical therapist who works with them to address specific physical deficits. This may only require one visit or the client may require multiple sessions with the therapist. Together, the therapist and the client develop an individualized exercise program to meet the individual’s personalized goals. Konlian explained that someone with an injury, such as a lumbar spine injury, may need additional services like joint/soft tissue mobilizations or specialized balance training, something that will be recognized by the licensed physical therapist but could be missed by a personal trainer.

“The most important thing about this membership is that the rehab portion is completely covered by most insurance policies,” Konlian said. “We accept Medicare, Medicaid and just about every health insurance plan available. Exercising properly pre- or post-rehab is very important. Often, people come into a gym and end up hurting themselves because they don’t know what to do or how to properly exercise. We don’t allow that to happen. We constantly monitor everyone in the gym and correct errors as we see them. We may suggest adding reps or weights. We may talk to them about changing things up. Whatever we think needs to be done to help them reach their goals.”

Free weights at Milford Lifestyles and Fitness Center

COVID-19 protocols are in place at the gym. Temperature checks are required at the door and face coverings must be worn when clients are not on machines. All staff wear masks and there are hand sanitizer stations throughout the gym. All machines are sanitized three times each day by staff and members are required to sanitize after they finish using the machines.

The Post-Rehab Membership is designed for anyone who has suffered a severe injury or deals with a debilitating illness. People with fibromyalgia suffer global muscle soreness which makes exercise painful. However, the only treatment for the illness is exercise which can be excruciatingly painful.

“When the average person works out initially, they have to deal with muscle soreness,” Ryan Spotts, Milford Wellness Center Coordinator, said. “For someone with fibromyalgia, the pain is significantly worse and the person simply quits exercising. We can help develop a plan that will help keep them exercising which is the best treatment to maintain and improve their function.”

Weight machines at Milford Fitness and Lifestyle Center

Konlian explained that cancer patients are another group that benefit from a post-rehab membership. After cancer treatment, many people have range of motion, severe fatigue or other restrictions due to surgery, radiation or chemotherapy. The post-rehab membership allows them to safely modify their exercise program in order to regain their health.

Once the client completed the post-rehab program, they may transition to the wellness program available through the center. The physical therapist develops a continued comprehensive exercise program that includes strength, flexibility and cardiovascular training. They still meet with a physical therapist, physical therapist assistant or personal trainer three times for 30 minutes in a 30-day period to review their program.

In addition to the post-rehab membership, there are other beneficial programs available at the center. There are weight-loss programs or those designed for individuals with diabetes or hypertension. Konlian explained that exercise for weight loss is critical in addressing the health risks associated with those conditions, yet people are not sure how to go about achieving that. She explained that the staff at the center works with each client to be sure the program is individualized to fit their own goals and needs.

“We offer a women’s health program,” Konlian said. “We have a pelvic floor therapist on site to work with pregnant women. Pregnancy is very hard on a woman’s body and, even if the woman has no pain or issues during the pregnancy, problems can occur after birth or in subsequent pregnancies. In addition, we offer programs designed for those with lower back pain as well as for people who are older who have specialized needs when it comes to exercise.”

Konlian pointed out that when the gym was located in the former hospital, it was very popular with local residents and she is ready to welcome them back. With COVID-19 protocols in place, it is safe for anyone to return to an exercise regimen. Because diabetes and obesity are risk factors for developing more severe cases of COVID-19, an exercise program may be one of the best protections.

Anyone who is interested in the post-rehab membership or any other membership available at the fitness center can call 302-491-6974 or visit the website at www.milforddefitness.com. The initial consultation is free and Konlian recommends that if someone is interested in signing up, they should schedule for an evaluation with a physical therapist which is covered by insurance.